Contact IDT for Business Continuity, Cabling, Citrix, Conference Bridge, Disaster Recovery, Hosted PBX, HP, Life Size, Managed Services, Mobility, Network Security, Phone System, ShoreTel, SIP, Unified Communications, VDI, Video Conferencing, Virtualization, VoIP, and Wide Area Networks. Proudly supporting the areas of Anaheim, Brea, Burbank, Chino, City of Industry, Commerce, Corona, El Segundo, Fullerton, Irvine, La Mirada, Los Angeles, Ontario, Palm Springs, Pasadena, Pomona, Riverside, Santa Ana, Torrance, Vernon, and surrounding areas.

CONTACT US TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION

Contact Interactive Data & Telephone for Business Continuity in FullertonCabling in FullertonCitrix in FullertonConference Bridge in FullertonDisaster Recovery in Fullerton,Hosted PBX in FullertonHP in FullertonLife Size in FullertonManaged Services in FullertonMobility in FullertonNetwork Security in FullertonPhone System in FullertonShoreTel in FullertonSIP in FullertonUnified Communications in FullertonVDI in FullertonVideo Conferencing in FullertonVirtualization in Fullerton,VoIP in FullertonWide Area Networks in Fullerton, and in surrounding areas.

Below is some general information about Fullerton:

Fullerton is a city located in northern Orange County, California. As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 135,161. Fullerton was founded in 1887 by George and Edward Amerige and named for George H. Fullerton, who secured the land on behalf of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway. Historically it was a center of agriculture, notably groves of Valencia oranges and other citrus crops; petroleum extraction; transportation; and manufacturing. It is home to several higher educational institutions, notably California State University, Fullerton and Fullerton College.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 22.4 square miles. 22.4 square miles of it is land and 0.01 square miles of it (0.05%) is water. It is bordered by La Habra and Brea on the north, La Mirada on the northwest, Buena Park on the west, Anaheim on the south, and Placentia on the east. The flat downtown area is laid out in a grid plan centered at the intersection of Harbor Boulevard and Commonwealth Avenue. After recent renewal and beautification projects, it has attracted specialty stores, coffee shops, and restaurants, and has uncharacteristically retained much of its downtown character. Southeastern Fullerton is historically the industrial sector, and is home to small manufacturing, particularly east of Raymond Street and south of Commonwealth. The northern and western reaches of Fullerton are dominated by the Coyote Hills, a low-lying mountain range divided into the East Coyote Hills and West Coyote Hills; the lands nestled to their south and west are known as Sunny Hills. For most of the cityÕs history these areas were groves of citrus trees, open scrubland, and oil fields. While equestrian trails and many old estates endure along Bastanchury Road, the meandering roads through these areas today mostly connect a succession of housing tract subdivisions and commercial developments. In recent years, the City Council has tried to allow development in the remaining open land throughout the city. The most notable impending project, in West Coyote Hills, has been met with opposition by some of the citizens in the area.

Fullerton is a general law city with a council-manager government system. Legislative authority is vested in a city council of five non-partisan members who serve four-year staggered terms, who elect a chair who serves as mayor but hire a professional city manager for day-to-day operations. All council seats are elected at large. Elections are held every two years and are consolidated with the statewide general elections held in November of even numbered years. As of February 2013 there were 62,295 registered voters in the city. In the California State Legislature, Fullerton is located in the 29th Senate District, represented by Republican Bob Huff, and in the 65th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Sharon Quirk-Silva. Federally, Fullerton is located in California’s 39th congressional district, which has a Cook PVI of R +7 and is represented by Republican Ed Royce.

Fullerton is home to a vibrant music scene. It was a center for the Orange County hardcore punk music scene, producing acts such as The Adolescents, Agent Orange, Social Distortion, D.I., and T.S.O.L., the “fathers of hardcore punk” The Middle Class, Gwen Stefani, lead vocalist of the alternative rock group No Doubt, was a student at CSUF and the group performed there regularly. Other popular groups from the area include The Offspring and Lit. The popular singer-songwriter Jackson Browne also attended Sunny Hills High School in the city. Contributing greatly to Fullerton’s musical heritage was the Fender musical instrument company, whose products such as the Stratocaster and Telecaster electric guitars, Precision Bass bass guitar, and Twin Reverb guitar amplifier revolutionized the music business and contributed greatly to the development of rock and roll. Leo Fender sold the company to CBS in 1964; production continued in the Fullerton plant until 1985, when the then-ruined company was sold to a group of private investors. In 1980, Leo Fender and his original partner George Fullerton reunited and started a new company, G&L (George and Leo) Guitars, which are built in what had been Leo Fender’s CLF Research factory in Fullerton.

Fullerton, founded as a railroad town, is still bisected by the BNSF Railway, upon whose tracks run Amtrak trains 3 and 4, the Southwest Chief, between Chicago and Los Angeles, the Pacific Surfliner to Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, and San Diego and Metrolink commuter rail trains. Average trip time on Metrolink or Amtrak to Los Angeles is 30 minutes. The Fullerton Train Station is located downtown at the Fullerton Transportation Center, which also serves as a major bus depot for the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA). Fullerton is crossed by three major freeways. State Route 91 runs east-to-west down the length of the city south of Orangethorpe Avenue. It intersects with Interstate 5, the Santa Ana Freeway, in the west near Magnolia Avenue and with State Route 57, the Orange Freeway, in the east near State College Boulevard. Fullerton Municipal Airport, the only general aviation airport remaining in Orange County, located in the southwest of the city, is the last remnant of the Hughes Company in the area, which was prominent in the aerospace industry up until the 1970s. From the early 1970s through the early 1980s the airport was served by Golden West Airlines, one of the larger commuter airlines of the period.

Source: Fullerton on Wikipedia